Neil Peart, who was hands down one of the most brilliant drummers in the rock music scene just passed away after an ongoing battle with brain cancer. Peart was a part of the band, Rush, and with his prolific music skills, both with the drums and in songwriting, the band skyrocketed to fame.

Peart passed away at the age of 67, in Santa Monica, California, and the band tweeted a couple days later saying,
“Our friend, soul brother and band mate of over 45 years, Neil, has lost his incredibly brave three and a half year battle with brain cancer,”

When Peart joined bassist and vocalist Geddy Lee and guitarist Alex Lifeson in 1974, he helped take the Canadian band to new heights, garnering a lot of attention from other rock gods. So much so that, the band was even inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
Peart was also Rush’s primary lyricist, drawing inspiration from sources like Ayn Rand and Mark Twain.
In fact, the band’s song “Tom Sawyer” is considered one of their breakthrough hits to this day. In fact, even those who aren’t familiar with rock music are well aware of this track and that simply shows the extent of their impact.

Rush was formed in 1968 but they truly came into their own once Peart was onboard.
Peart wasn’t afraid to experiment with various themes in his lyrics, no matter how odd they might’ve seemed. And perhaps that was the key to creating a string of musical masterpieces. His lyrics transformed the band’s songs into those that explored science fiction, magic and philosophy, therefore setting their songs apart from that of other bands.

After the news of his passing, even the Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau spoke up about him, pointing out that a legend had been lost. “But his influence and legacy will live on forever in the hearts of music lovers in Canada and around the world. RIP Neil Peart.”

We will always remember his standout performances and of course, his extraordinary lyrics. His music will live on with us.

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